"La Rivista di Engramma (open access)" ISSN 1826-901X

Editorial Guidelines for Authors

The editors of Engramma invite the contributors to follow the editorial guidelines set out below.

I. FORMAT

♦ Submit a clean Word file, with no styles, no automatic formatting (bulleted or numbered lists, automatic titles, indexing of terms etc.), no tables, and no indentations at the beginning of paragraphs;
♦ You must use Unicode fonts for all characters that are in non-Latin alphabets;
♦ Separate each paragraph with a single return (enter). Paragraphing will then be applied during the editing process, to comply with layout and editing requirements.

II. FOOTNOTES

♦ Turn all possible footnotes into bibliographic abbreviations that can be inserted directly in the text;
♦ Avoid long digressive footnotes or footnotes that tend to veer off the subject or address secondary issues;
♦ Any necessary footnotes are to be inserted in the text, in brackets, numbered consecutively, marked as < (footnote 1) >, < (footnote 2) >, etc., and highlighted with a colour.

III. ILLUSTRATIONS

♦ Submit images separately, in .tiff or .jpg format (with a resolution of 300 dpi or more): every submission must include at least one image;
♦ The location of the images is to be marked in the text in brackets, numbered consecutively, as < (fig. 1) >, < (fig. 2) >, etc., and highlighted with a colour;
♦ In the case of images that are meant to be compared and contrasted,  clearly point out which images should be set together;
♦ In case a particular paragraph were to present many potentially crowded images, clearly point out which images can/should be mounted in a single horizontal strip;
♦ Captions for the images are to be provided, and they should immediately follow the end of the whole text. Captions should be complete of: Name of the author, Title of the artwork or image, Technique and material, Place of origin (if known), Date or period, Location (museum/private collection), Inventory number (essential in the case of archaeological pieces).

IV. ENGLISH ABSTRACT

♦ Provide an English abstract with a general summary of the contribution (approximately 800 to 2000 characters).

V. GRAPHIC CONSISTENCY

♦ Ensure all spelling and graphic choices (italic, uppercase / lowercase, etc.) are uniform for all recurrent terms so as to be consistent throughout the whole text. For Example:

Chorus (as a part in a text) / Chorus (when identifying a character)
parados
Greek Theater of Syracuse
Second World War

♦ Acronyms should be written in lowercase with capitalised first letter (for example: < Inda > and not < INDA >);
♦ Make sure to distinguish lexical hyphens (n dash)  < - > from syntactic dashes (m dash) < − >: a hyphen joins two or more words together while a dash separates words into parenthetical statements. Hyphens do not have a space preceding or following it while dashes do. Also, dashes usually aren’t followed by any other punctuation mark.

V.1 CORSIVI

♦ The following words are always to be set in italics:

– Any kind of title (book, artwork, music piece, etc.);
– Foreign words;
– Transliterations from other languages with different spellings or alphabets.

♦ Words from ancient or foreign languages that have become common use do not go in italics, for example: abstract, audience, blitz, brand, file, film, gadget, incipit, link, online, pc, polis, raptus, smartphone, social network, souvenir, standard, tablet, target, web, etc.

V.2 QUOTATION MARKS

♦ Only two types of quotation marks are allowed:

– Double quotation marks < “ ” > for direct text quotations;
– Single quotation marks < ‘ ’ > for emphasis or to highlight a single term.

V.3 GREEK (AND NON-LATIN ALPHABETS)

♦ Generally, Greek is not transliterated; single terms can be translated but without accents (for example: pathos, mimesis, katharsis);
♦ Always use Greek characters in longer quotes, making sure that they are Unicode throughout all files.

VI. QUOTATIONS

♦ Preferably, everything should be quoted in its original language and be accompanied by a translation;
♦ Omissions in quoted texts are to be marked with an ellipsis of three dots in square brackets  < […] >;
♦ Quotations that are long should not be in quotation marks but in a separate paragraph, preceded and followed by a blank line.

VI.1 REFERENCES TO ANCIENT TEXTS OR AUTHORS

♦ Titles of ancient texts can be quoted in extended form in both Italian or Latin, as long as they are always referred to in the same way throughout the whole contribution;
♦ Specific references to passages from ancient texts are to be marked in abbreviated form: the form is that of the classic Latin abbreviations commonly used in the international scientific and academic field. The specific passage should then be clearly marked right afterward;
♦ In the quotation of classical poems, omit the initials between the abbreviated title and the verse numbers;
♦ Omit the comma between the author’s name  and the title, and also between the title and the page or verse numbers. For example:

Aesch. Pr. 1-5;
Thuc. V 26.2;
Sen. Med. 125-130

♦ For Greek authors, the abbreviations are those as indicated in the Liddell-Scott-Jones dictionary, with the following exceptions:

Aristophanes = Aristoph.
Bacchylides = Bacch.
Demosthenes = Dem.
Aeschylus = Aesch.
Euripides = Eur.
Pindar = Pind.
Xenophon = Xen.
Sophocles = Soph.
Thucydides = Thuc.

VI.2 REFERENCES TO MODERN TEXTS OR AUTHORS

♦ References to passages from modern texts should be marked, where possible, according to traditional order: book, canto, paragraph, chapter, verse, etc. In this case, a comma between author and title should be inserted. However, there should be no comma between the title and the specific passage. For example:

Dante, Inferno XXXI, 44-47;
Ariosto, Orlando Furioso XX, 55, 1-3;
Shakespeare, Hamlet V 1, 2.

VI.3 ABBREVIATIONS AND BIBLIOGRAPHIC REFERENCES

♦ All references to secondary bibliography should be included directly in the text, in parentheses, according to the order: followed by the page numbers without the < p./pp. > abbreviation. In case the consulted edition is not the original (for example, a more recent edition or a translation), the original edition’s publishing year should be included, in square brackets, between the author's name and the consulted edition’s year. For example:

Red 1985, 44-65.
Panofsky [1939] 1975, 102.

♦ The bibliography will be in alphabetical order at the end of each contribution. The bibliographic abbreviations that are present throughout the text will be extended to include all required bibliographic information.

♦ If required by the contribution, the author may add a bibliographical note on the specific topic of the essay.

♦ In this final extended bibliography the information regarding the original edition must be indicated in the most complete way possible − including place of publication, translator, etc. − according to the following general guidelines:

– volume:

Abbreviation < Author year >
Author (first initial with period; if there is a second name: second initial with period and a space between the first and second initials), Title, Place of publication and date.

Taplin 2007
O. Taplin, Pots & Plays. Interactions between Tragedy and Greek Vase-painting of the Fourth Century B.C., Los Angeles 2007.

– translated volume:

Abbreviation < Author [year] year >
Author (first initial with period; if there is a second name: second initial with period and a space between the first and second initials), Translated title [Original title, original place of publication and year], Translation by (translator name), Place of publication and date.

Panofsky [1939] 1970
E. Panofsky, Studi di iconologia [Studies in Iconology. Humanistic Themes In the Art of the Renaissance, New York 1939], translation by Renato Pedio, Torino 1975.

– contributions from a volume:

Abbreviation < Author [year] year >
Author (first initial with period; if there is a second name: second initial with period and a space between the first and second initials), Contribution title, in Author/Editor name (Id./Ead. if it’s the same contributor’s name; followed by the abbreviation, in parentheses, in the appropriate language: a cura di; ed./eds.; éd./éds.; hrsg. v.), Volume title, Place of publication and date, Page numbers.

Vernant 1986
J. P. Vernant, Corps obscur, corps éclatant, in Ch. Malamoud, J. P. Vernant (éds.), Corps des dieux, Paris 1986, 19-45.

Benjamin 1966
W. Benjamin, Piccola storia della fotografia [Kleine Geschichte der Photographie, “Die Literarische Welt”, 1931], in Id., L’opera d’arte nell’epoca della sua riproducibilità tecnica, traduzione di E. Filippini, Torino 1966, 57-78.

– article/essay from a periodical:

Abbreviation < Author [year] year >
Author (first initial with period; if there is a second name: second initial with period and a space between the first and second initials), Contribution title, “Periodical name” num./vol. (year/month year in parentheses), Page numbers.

Martin-Velasco 2007
M. J. Martin-Velasco, Medea. An Example of How Destructive Rhetoric Can Become, “Rosetta” 3 (2007), 1-16.

– article from a newspaper:

Abbreviation < Author [year] year >
Author (first initial with period; if there is a second name: second initial with period and a space between the first and second initials), Contribution title, “Newspaper name”, day month year (no page numbers).

Canfora 2013
L. Canfora, Artemidoro, le vie del falso sono finite, "Corriere della Sera", 5 aprile 2013.

– contribution by different authors (separated by a comma in the related abbreviation):

Abbreviation < Author, Author year >
Author, (first initial with period; if there is a second name: second initial with period and a space between the first and second initials), Contribution title, in Author/Editor name (Id./Ead. if it’s the same contributor’s name; followed by the abbreviation, in parentheses, in the appropriate language: a cura di; ed./eds.; éd./éds.; hrsg. v.), Volume title, Place of publication and date, Page numbers.

Agosti, Farinella 1984
G. Agosti, V. Farinella, Calore del marmo. Pratiche e tipologie delle deduzioni iconografiche, in S. Settis (a cura di), Memoria dell’antico nell’arte italiana, vol. I  "L’uso dei classici", Torino 1984, 373-444.